Male Infertility

Male Infertility

fatherPossible causes of Male infertility

  • Toxicity and damage to sperm: this could affect sperm count, quality and morphology
  • Current infection of the prostrate or seminal vesicles
  • Past infections such as chlamydia, ureaplasma or mycoplasma hominis
  • Nutrient deficiencies: our modern day diets are often lacking in essential nutrients required for sperm health and optimal general health
  • Excessive weight
  • Social drugs including alcohol, smoking and marijuana. There is evidence of chromosomal damage occurring from marijuana use. Therefore recreational drugs need to be completely avoided for several months before attempting to conceive. Sperm being produced now will not be ejaculated for three months.
  • Certain pharmaceutical drugs: A side effect of prescription medication. These may include steroids, antibiotics, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors. Some of these medications may affect spermatogenesis. (sperm production). Whilst it would be unwise to stop taking prescription medication, it may be possible to reduce your need for this medication by taking steps to modify your lifestyle and food intake and utilise complementary therapies such as herbal medicine.
  • Heavy metals within the body
  • Exposure to electromagnetic radiation
  • Excessive exercise which is likely to produce excessive heat around the male reproductive organs. Cycling in tight fitting clothing may affect heat to this area. Also saunas, tight trousers, wetsuits, hot baths and laptops placed directly on the lap will increase heat to the testes. The testes hang in the scrotum, outside the body to maintain a cooler temperature
  • Stress: affects male hormones and all body systems
  • Damage to the testicles from drugs, trauma, radiation, and illness such as TB, gonorrhoea and mumps
  • Abnormal penile erection or ejaculation. (associated with medication, stress or spinal cord injury)
  • Hormonal imbalance. The most common being an elevated testosterone level. Other hormonal imbalances include elevated prolactin, raised/ or lowered luteinising hormone and/ or follicle stimulating hormone. All of these can be tested for and treated using natural therapies
  • Undescended testicles (this can be remedied with surgery)
  • Systemic illness such as cirrhosis of the liver, chronic renal insufficiency, haemochromatosis, sickle cell anaemia
  • Torsion (twisting of the testes in the scrotum)
  • Blocked tubes (vas deferens or epididymis), or absence of these organs
  • Varicoceles in the testicles (surgery is possible)
  • Toxicity in the body
  • Vasectomy : following a vasectomy reversal herbal medicine, nutritional and lifestyle changes can improve sperm health
  • Undetected infections
  • Sperm production problems due to chromosomal or genetic causes
  • Antibody production: autoimmune reactions may result in the formation of sperm antibodies that may clump, immobilize sperm or interfere with sperm function. Either partner may have sperm antibodies.
  • Morphology: Abnormal spermatozoa have difficulty penetrating cervical mucus, because the sperm can’t pass through the cervical channels that are too small to admit enlarged or deformed sperm. Abnormal morphology is often associated with low sperm counts and poor sperm motility, although it can occur when these other factors are at normal levels. The anti-oxidants such as zinc, Vitamins A, C, E and selenium along with the detoxification herbs are required in large amounts to prevent sperm morphology.
  • Viscosity: Semen may fail to liquefy and will remain highly viscous. This slows sperm motility and may impair the movement of sperm into the cervical mucous.
  • Volume: Either too little or too much seminal fluid can cause problems.
  • Acidity:  If the pH of the semen is low (acidic) it can cause the sperm to be immobilised. Acid cervical mucus can create poor sperm migration. Implementing dietary changes to eat more alkaline forming foods can change the pH balance to more alkaline, which favours sperm motility.

To read about female infertility issues and how I can help, click here.